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Hubble

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Composite image of the colorful Helix Nebula taken with the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Mosaic II Camera on the 4-meter telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.
Composite image of the colorful Helix Nebula taken with the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Mosaic II Camera on the 4-meter telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.
Gas released by a dying star races across space at more than 600,000 miles an hour, forming the delicate shape of a celestial butterfly. This image (popularly referred to as the Butterfly Nebula) was one of the first images captured by Hubble’s new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) installed by NASA astronauts during the final servicing mission and is featured in the IMAX®  film, HUBBLE.
Gas released by a dying star races across space at more than 600,000 miles an hour, forming the delicate shape of a celestial butterfly. This image (popularly referred to as the Butterfly Nebula) was one of the first images captured by Hubble’s new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) installed by NASA astronauts during the final servicing mission and is featured in the new IMAX® film, HUBBLE.
A stellar jet in the Carina Nebula
A stellar jet in the Carina Nebula
STS-125 astronaut Andrew Feustel transfers the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement unit (COSTAR) from the Hubble Space Telescope to its temporary stowage position in the Space Shuttle Atlantis cargo bay.
STS-125 astronaut Andrew Feustel transfers the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement unit (COSTAR) from the Hubble Space Telescope to its temporary stowage position in the Space Shuttle Atlantis cargo bay.
Astronaut John Grunsfeld (on the shuttle arm) passes a new cover (called a NOBL) to astronaut Andrew Feustel (to the left).
Astronaut John Grunsfeld (on the shuttle arm) passes a new cover (called a NOBL) to astronaut Andrew Feustel (to the left).
Astronaut Michael Good (on the Shuttle’s remote manipulator arm) assists astronaut Michael Massimino into foot restraints to position him inside the Hubble Space Telescope without disturbing sensitive instruments he must work around.astronaut Michael Good (on the Shuttle’s remote manipulator arm) assists astronaut Michael Massimino into foot restraints to position him inside the Hubble Space Telescope without disturbing sensitive instruments he must work around.
Astronaut Michael Good (on the Shuttle’s remote manipulator arm) assists astronaut Michael Massimino into foot restraints to position him inside the Hubble Space Telescope without disturbing sensitive instruments he must work around.
Astronauts replace a Fine Guidance Sensor in the mission’s fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA).
Astronauts replace a Fine Guidance Sensor in the mission’s fifth and final session of extravehicular activity (EVA).
The Space Shuttle Atlantis moves away from the Hubble Space Telescope just after release at the conclusion of the final servicing mission.
The Space Shuttle Atlantis moves away from the Hubble Space Telescope just after release at the conclusion of the final servicing mission.
After completion of the final repairs, the Space Shuttle Atlantis' remote manipulator system arm lifts the Hubble Space Telescope from the cargo bay and is moments away from releasing the orbital observatory.
After completion of the final repairs, the Space Shuttle Atlantis' remote manipulator system arm lifts the Hubble Space Telescope from the cargo bay and is moments away from releasing the orbital observatory.
Three-time Academy-Award® nominee Leonardo DiCaprio records narration for HUBBLE.
Three-time Academy-Award® nominee Leonardo DiCaprio records narration for HUBBLE.

Through the power of IMAX, Hubble enables movie-goers to journey through distant galaxies to explore the grandeur and mysteries of our celestial surroundings and to accompany space-walking astronauts as they attempt the most difficult and important tasks in NASA’s history. The 2010 film offers stunning imagery of distant galaxies and the birth of stars and planets. Narrated by Leonardo DiCaprio, Hubble offers an inspiring and unique look into the Hubble Space Telescope’s legacy and highlights its profound impact on the way we view the universe and ourselves.

The Fleet is pleased to offer the Rear Window closed-captioning system. When you purchase your ticket, tell the guest services associate that you would like to use the closed-caption service. The service is complimentary, and it is accessible in the upper-right seating area of the theater.

Listen in Spanish while the show plays in English. Ask for a complimentary headset at the Ticket Counter.

Assistive listening devices increase the intelligibility of theater presentations by enhancing the narration and dialogue and lowering music and sound effects. Ask for a complimentary headset at the Ticket Counter.